On November 7, just months after issuing its first 2,000-pesos banknote, the Banco Central de la República Argentina (BCRA) has put into circulation an upgraded version of the note. While the design of the note remains relatively unchanged, several security features have been added.

The upgraded note will be gradually distributed through the network of bank branches across the country. This banknote starts with the “E” series. Both versions of the 2,000-pesos banknote will circulate alongside each other.

Minor changes to the original design

The visual design of Argentina’s upgraded 2,000-pesos banknote has been slightly modified to accommodate new security features. For example, the number 2000, on the back side, has been moved to make room for the electrotype watermark. The reverse shows part of the main vignette in a different color, and the signatures in a different place.

The visual design of Argentina’s upgraded 2,000-pesos banknote has been slightly modified to accommodate new security features. Some of the new security features can be seen in the images above.

Added security features make the new banknote more secure

The most important upgrades to the 2,000-pesos banknote are its security features, which include the following:

Watermark: On the white area, the portraits of Ramón Carrillo, MD, and Cecilia Grierson, MD, and their initials become visible in a light color when the banknote is held up to the light.

Windowed security thread: A green security thread is woven—in three windows—into the banknote. A solid band with the acronym “BCRA” becomes visible when the banknote is held up to the light. As the note is tilted, this thread has a dynamic effect.

Optical variability ink (OVI): The image changes color from green to blue as the banknote is tilted, with a three-dimensional dynamic effect.

Latent image: The initials “RA” become visible when the banknote is held horizontally, at eye level, and to the light.

See-through register: When the banknote is held up to the light, the images on the obverse and reverse sides combine to form the “2,000” denomination.

A feature for the visually impaired

As in the first version of the banknote, there are a series of raised lines along the left and right edges of the front side; these are designed to help visually impaired consumers recognize the note’s denomination.

Sources/References:

Banco Central de la República Argentina

MRI Banker’s Guide to Foreign Currency

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